Marx’s Capital

A Student Edition

Author: Karl Marx


Editor: C.J. Arthur

£20.00

IN STOCK

ISBN: 9781912064847 Categories: ,

Format: Paperback

Publication date: August 1, 2018

Page extent: 384

113 in stock

‘Whatever the state of current politics, Karl Marx remains one of the great thinkers of the modern world. Chris Arthur has solved the problem of slimming down Capital, without tearing the fabric of Marx’s argument or losing the flavour of his style, with exceptional success. All students will have reason to thank him.’ E.J. Hobsbawm

This new printing of C. J. Arthur’s student edition of Marx’s most famous text is re-issued for Marx’s 200th birthday.

Marx’s Capital: A Student Edition makes one of the most influential texts of the modern era open and accessible to readers.

Karl Marx’s Capital was first published in 1867, since when it has become the classic text of Marxism for professional economists, social scientists, philosophers, students, and political activists alike. But the sheer extent of Marx’s great work of political economy has often daunted readers, and hampered their understanding of his ideas. Harold Wilson once jokingly claimed he gave up when he came across a two-page footnote on the first page.

C.J. Arthur, whose student edition of The German Ideology by Marx and Engels has long proved popular, has substantially edited and abridged Marx’s monumental work. His efforts make this book, one of the most influential texts of the modern era, open and accessible to readers as never before.

Editor’s Introduction

Preface to the First German Edition

Afterword to the Second German Edition

PART I – COMMODITIES AND MONEY

Chapter 1 – Commodities
Section 1. The Two Factors of a Commodity: Use-value and Value

Section 2. The Two-fold Character of the Labour Embodied in Commodities

Section 3. The Form of Value or Exchange-value
A. Elementary or Accidental Form of Value
B. Total or Expanded Form of Value
C. The General Form of Value
D. The Money-form
Section 4. The Fetishism of Commodities and the Secret thereof
Chapter 2 – Exchange

Chapter 3 – Money, or the Circulation of Commodities
Section 1. The Measure of Values
Section 2. The Medium of Circulation
Section 3. Money

PART IITHE TRANSFORMATION OF MONEY INTO CAPITAL

Chapter 4 – The General Formula for Capital

Chapter 5 – Contradictions in the General Formula of Capital
Chapter 6 – The Buying and Selling of Labour-power

PART IIITHE PRODUCTION OF ABSOLUTE SURPLUSVALUE

Chapter 7 – The Labour-process and the Process of Producing  Surplus-value
Section 1. The Labour-process or the Producdon of Use-values
Section 2. The Production of Surplus-value
Chapter 8 – Constant Capital and Variable Capital
Chapter 9 – The Rate of Surplus-value

Chapter 10 – The Working Day
Section 1. The Limits of the Working Day

Section 2. The Greed for Surplus-labour

Section 3. Branches of English Industry without Legal Limits to Exploitation

Section 4. Day and Night Work. The Relay System
Section 5. The Struggle for a Normal Working Day
Section 6. The English Factory Acts, 1833 to 1864

Section 7. Reaction of the English Factory Acts on Other Countries

Chapter 11 – Rate and Mass of Surplus-value

PART IVPRODUCTION OF RELATIVE SURPLUSVALUE

Chapter 12 – The Concept of Relative Surplus-value

Chapter 13 – Cooperation

Chapter 14 – Division of Labour and Manufacture
Section 1. Two-fold Origin of Manufacture

Section 2. The Detail Labourer and his Implements
Section 3. The Two Fundamental Forms of Manufacture: Heterogeneous Manufacture, Serial Manufacture
Section 4. Division of Labour in Manufacture, and Division of Labour in Society

Section 5. The Capitalistic Character of Manufacture
Chapter 15 – Machinery and Modern Industry
Section 1. The Development of Machinery
Section 2. The Value Transferred by Machinery to the Product

Section 3. The Proximate Effects of Machinery on the Workman

Section 4. The Factory

Section 5. The Strife between Workman and Machine
Section 6. The Theory of Compensation as regards the Workpeople Displaced by Machinery

Section 7. Repulsion and Attraction of Workpeople by the Factory System. Crises in the Cotton Trade

Section 8. Revolution Effected in Manufacture, Handicrafts, and Domestic Industry by Modern Industry
Section 9. The Factory Acts. Educational Clauses of the Same. Their General Extension in England
Section 10. Modern Industry and Agriculture

PART V – THE PRODUCTION OF ABSOLUTE AND OF RELATIVE SURPLUSVALUE

Chapter 16 – Absolute and Relative Surplus-value

Chapter 17 – Changes of Magnitude in the Price of Labour-power and in Surplus-value

PART VIWAGES

Chapter 19 – The Transformation of the Value (and Respectively the Price) of Labour-power into Wages

Chapter 22 – National Differences in Wages

PART VIITHE ACCUMULATION OF CAPITAL

Chapter 23 – Simple Reproduction

Chapter 24 – Conversion of Surplus-value into Capital
Section 1. Capitalist Production on a Progressively Increasing Scale. Transition of the Laws of Property that Characterise Production of Commodities into Laws of Capitalist Appropriation
Section 3. Separation of Surplus-value into Capital and Revenue
Chapter 25 – The General Law of Capitalist Accumulation
Section 1. The Increased Demand for Labour-power that Accompanies Accumulation, the Composition of Capital Remaining the Same
Section 2. Relative Diminution of the Variable Part of Capital Simultaneously with the Progress of Accumulation and of the Concentration that Accompanies it
Section 3. Progressive Production of a Relative Surplus population or Industrial Reserve Army
Section 4. Different Forms of the Relative Surpluspopulation.
The General Law of Capitalistic Accumulation

PART VIIITHE SOCALLED PRIMITIVE ACCUMULATION

Chapter 26 – The Secret of Primitive Accumulation
Chapter 27 – Expropriation of the Agricultural Population from the Land
Chapter 28 – Bloody Legislation against the Expropriated from the End of the Fifteenth Century
Chapter 32 – Historical Tendency of Capitalist Accumulation

Index

‘Whatever the state of current politics, Karl Marx remains one of the great thinkers of the modern world. Chris Arthur has solved the problem of slimming down Capital, without tearing the fabric of Marx’s argument or losing the flavour of his style, with exceptional success. All students will have reason to thank him.’ E.J. Hobsbawm

‘A skilful abridgement. Approachable and readable’

– Sean Sayers, Political Studies